Beer Festivals Around the World in 2018

If you like to travel there are great places to visit all over the world with unique cultures and customs. There are often things to be seen and experienced in these places that can be found nowhere else. Experiencing local culture can broaden your horizons, open your mind to new possibilities and give you deeper understanding of yourself and your place in the world. And what better way is there than to experience a culture than during a craft beer festival.

If you’re planning to travel this year but haven’t decided where to go, I have some suggestions.

The Great Australian Beer SpecTAPular, Sydney, Australia (June 2, 2018)

Created in 2011, the Great Australian Beers SpecTAPular (GABS) is held in cities across Australia, but the festival in Sydney stands out. It features hundreds of beers and ciders from the best Australian and New Zealand craft breweries and cider producers, including nearly 180 beers and ciders made just for this event. There will be a wide variety of exceptional local foods, interactive exhibitions, food and drink educational seminars, along with exciting entertainment and activities.

With so many of Australia’s finest craft breweries releasing a brand-new beer on the same day and in the same place, this should definitely be on your must-do list.

North Sea Beer Festival, Oostende, Belgium (August 24-26, 2018)

Belgium is known for good beer. And while you may normally think of Brussels when you think of Belgian beer, the North Sea Beer Festival in Oostende Belgium is the place to sample the finest beers in Belgium. This festival takes place the last weekend in August from the 24th to the 26th and features the best of Belgian beer.

There will be over 200 different beers from more than 30 breweries, as well as a wide variety of local foods to sample. The event will take place in Leopold Park, in the heart of Oostende. If you enjoy a good Belgian style beer, this is a festival you won’t want to miss.

Edinburgh Craft Beer Festival, Edinburgh, Scotland (May 25-27, 2018)

The Edinburgh Craft Beer Festival is no ordinary beer festival, it is an international event featuring both world class Scottish and international beers poured by a crew of brewers who take great pride in their work. In addition to these finely crafted brews there will be an array of Edinburgh’s finest street food vendors and an incredible set of headline DJ acts.

This year’s Edinburgh Craft Beer Festival will be held at The Biscuit Factory in Edinburgh, so if you are t planning to visit Edinburgh, and you love craft beer, good food, and live music, you’re going to want to make sure you’ve got tickets for this event well in advance, because it will sell out.

Vancouver Craft Beer Week, Vancouver, Canada (May 25, thru June 3, 2018)

Established in 2010, Vancouver Craft Beer Week has grown to a week-long beer extravaganza of events that pair beers with delicious food and great music, competitions and awards celebrations, as well as showcasing rare brews and interesting imports.

The festival culminates at the fairgrounds in the Pacific National Exhibition where beer enthusiasts can sample 400 beers from over 100 breweries and enjoy timbersports (a modern version of a lumberjack challenge and with power tools and logs). The festival also includes art installations, food trucks, market stalls, brewing demonstrations, and a games area with pinball and foosball.

Irish Craft Beer Festival, Dublin, Ireland (September 6-7, 2018)

Ireland’s largest and best craft beer festival takes place Sep 6-7 this year and you won’t want to miss it. The Irish Craft Beer Festival will be held just outside of Dublin and is expected to include over 40 brewers with over 200 different Irish beers, and  a wide variety of local food venders.

You think Disney World is the happiest place on earth? This beer festival in Dublin will change your mind!

Great Japan Beer Festival, Yokohama 15th – 17th September 2018 in  Osanbashi Hall at Yokohama Port

Japan may be known for sake, but things are changing. Started in 2006, the Great Japan Beer Festival in Yokohama Japan is expecting over 9,500 participants this year. Craft beer has taken Japan by storm as craft breweries spread across the country, and this event will highlight some of the best craft beers in japan, as well as some of the finest beers from around the world.

This indoor festival consists of three sessions of three and a half hours each over a two day period, and is an all-you-care-to-drink event. Whether you are new to craft beer, or a veteran, this event is a great way to be introduced to some of the best beers of Japan.

The Great American Beer Festival, Denver, CO, USA (20-22 September, 2018)

The Great American Beer Festival is a three-day event started in 1982 and has grown bigger with each passing year. The event takes place at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver CO, and with over 800 breweries in attendance and 3,800 beers to sample, this event boasts the largest amount of beer served in a public tasting event.

The Great American Beer Festival is the largest beer festivals in America, and according to the Guinness Book of World Records there is no place on earth that has more beer on tap. Brewers from all over the country come together here to compete against each other, and to show off their finest brews. The beer is arranged geographically in the festival hall by region.

Oktoberfest, Munich, Germany (September 22, thru October 7, 2018)

Octoberfest is known world wide as the finical of beer festivals, and there is no better place than Munich to celebrate.  Six Munich breweries anticipate that over 6 million liters of beer will be consumed during this festival.

Beer and food will be sold in the tents around Munich from 10 am to 10:30 pm on weekdays and from 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Most companies hand out beer tokens to their guests, which can then be exchanged for beer in the respective tents, but tokens can also be purchased.

Every beer lover owes it to themselves to make the pilgrimage least once in their life to experience October Fest in Germany. And there is no better place in Germany to do that than Munich.

 

 

 

 

I see men, but where are the women?

Women drink beer. This shouldn’t surprise you since there’s a pretty good chance you know a woman, or even several, who drink beer, or you are a beer-drinking woman yourself. Women also brew, package, sell and market beer. This shouldn’t be news to anyone who has been on a brewery tour, attended a beer festival, or have heard of beer industry big names like Irene Firmat- founder of Full Sail Brewing, Kim Jordan- co-founder of New Belgium Brewing, or even craft beer pioneer Carol Stoudt- founder of Stoudt Brewing.

While women brewers are becoming more and more common in the modern craft brewing movement, there are still relatively few. Historically, brewing was done by women. Yet today brewing is seen mostly as the domain of young bearded men.

Beer is genderless and there is nothing strange about a woman drinking a beer. However, there is a significant difference in the number women and men who prefer beer or brew beer. Based on combined data from Gallup polls conducted from 2010 through 2016 about 54% of men preferred beer as opposed to 23% of women.  50% of women preferred wine where only 18% of men.

So why do more than twice as many men prefer beer than women? And why do nearly 3 time more women prefer wine than men?  I believe that the answer may be a combination of marketing, and stereo typing.

There has been a lot of criticism recently directed at the way beer is marketed and labeled. TV commercials and print adds usually depict men enjoying a beer, and when women appear in beer commercials or adds they are usually scantily clad women and serving beer to men.

Additionally, beer labels and beer names are often offensive to women and degrade women by objectifying them or playing on negative stereo types. Here are some examples of beer names: Leg-Spreader brewed by Route 2 Brews, Hoppy Bitch brewed by Northwest Brewing, Bitch Slap brewed by Pig Minds Brewing Co, Panty Peeler brewed by Midnight Sun Brewing, Thong Remover brewed by Village Idiot Brewing,  Naughty Girl brewed by Right Brain Brewery, Double D brewed by Dominion Brewing, Bare Ass Blonde brewed by DuClaw Brewing, and Tramp Stamp brewed by Clown Shoes Beer. The pictures that accompany these beer names depict women as promiscuous, scantily clad, or just plain crazy.

These types of beer names and depictions might very well be part of the reason some women prefer not to drink beer. Imagine if the tables were turned. Sound silly or over sensitive? Would your average guy reach for a beer called Woody Ale with a picture of a guy with his legs wrapped around a tree on the label? I can tell you that I personally wouldn’t be too excited to put my lips on a bottle depicting a guy dry humping a tree.

Of course, on television and in movies women are nearly always drinking wine while the men around them are drinking beer, reinforcing the stereotype that women drink wine and men drink beer. Have you ever watched Cougar Town, Sex and the City, or even The Big Bang Theory?

If women are being discouraged from drinking beer through advertising, beer names, beer labels, television shows, and movies, is it any wonder that not only do fewer women drink beer and even fewer women decide to go into brewing?

Women may not be intentionally discouraged from drinking and brewing beer, but the results are the same. About 77% of women prefer to drink something other than beer, and as a result would not likely consider a career in brewing. That is a lot of potential customers and a lot of potential brewers.

Perhaps before we name our beer and print the label, we should ask ourselves if we would feel comfortable serving it to our mothers or daughters.  I know I would be a little embarrassed to serve my mother Leg-Spreader, no matter how good the beer.

The growth of craft breweries: How many is too many?

Look around your city. Head out to your favorite bar. There’s a common theme emerging: craft beer is America’s new obsession.

From lagers to porters to ambers and beyond, craft breweries are offering up tasty alternatives to the nation’s 11 national breweries that own up to 90 percent of the beer in the US.

Let’s take a brief look at when this obsession started and whether or not this is a good thing for those of us who love beer.

The Explosion of Craft Breweries

According to the Brewers Association, the number of craft breweries in the United States in 1942 reached about 500. By the year 2000, that number had risen to 1,500. Seventeen years later and we have now reached the all-time high for craft breweries weighing in at over 5,300 independent breweries throughout the states.

The only other time we even came close to that number was in the late 1800s, which was long before prohibition and the monopolization of the industry. And even though the number of breweries might be relatively close now to what it was back then, you have to keep in mind that the population of the United States was much smaller back then.

In the 1870s there was approximately 1 brewery for every 11,000 people. To do that today we’d have to have some 30,000 breweries, a heck of a lot more than the 5,000 we have today.

And that number continues to rise. Independent brewers take their craft seriously and are absorbing ancient recipes and modern technology to create new species of beer.

Craft Beer Diversity- Why It Matters

Despite the growing number of craft breweries, over 90 percent of the beer available is still brewed by just 11 companies as we mentioned earlier. What does that mean for beer lovers? It means less variety and lower quality.

However, the good news is that this is beginning to change, little by little, and with each new brewery new flavors of beer emerge, giving beer lovers more options to choose from. The growing number of brewers are discovering new ways to brew, reviving lost or forgotten styles, and putting new twists on classic styles.  And it’s not just beer. Local brewers are using local ingredients and brewing beer with true local favor!

So the next time someone says to you there are too many breweries, let them know we still need another 25,000 just to catch up with the 1800s.